PLR License Terminology

Usually, when you purchase a private label rights (PLR) package, you’ll notice that it comes with a license and a list of terms. The rights and terms will determine how much flexibility you have when using the content

The PLR license terms are usually displayed on the sales page for the product so you know exactly what you’re getting. You’ll know what you can and cannot do with the PLR.

In some cases, the license terms may seem convoluted and even contradict each other. Very often, what happens here is that PLR buyers constantly try to circumvent the license rights by doing sneaky stuff.

Once the PLR vendor discovers this breach of terms, they’ll add a new term to their list of terms to prevent future buyers from flouting the rules. In this article, you’ll discover what the terms actually mean and why they are there.

The most common license terms that appear on many PLR sales pages are:

  1. “You may not use my name with this PLR/DFY content”
  2. “Don’t pass along the rights to others”

These terms first appeared in one of the top PLR seller’s sales pages… and everyone else started copying her.

While the terms are brief, they’re actually all-encompassing and a fantastic summary of the usual long list of PLR terms.

The reason you’re not allowed to use the VENDOR’s name with the PLR is to prevent future hassles.

If a PLR buyer sells an eBook with the vendor’s name but doesn’t deliver the content, now the customer will start looking for the PLR vendor since their name is associated with the content – when they should actually be looking for the person who sold them the book.

This is just one example of how PLR vendors may become responsible for what their customers do. To prevent such problems, PLR buyers are not allowed to use the vendors.

The second term to note is that you’re not allowed to pass on the rights to others. What that means is you can’t sell or give away the private label rights to the content.

That is the ORIGINAL PLR CREATOR’S job. Your job is to convert the PLR content into products to sell to end-consumers.

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